FAQ

FAQ

To be able to get a license you need to have already passed the Written Exam, received your Instruction Permit and have a valid State ID. If you don’t have a valid State ID, the following documentation will be required:

  1. Social Security Card (the original card)
  2. Passport
  3. Visa or any other form of identification (school ID, work ID, birth certificate, etc.)
  4. Proof of address
Lakes, ponds, rivers, streams – they're all great places to find fish. Bays and estuaries contain a mixture of fresh water and salt water, so they'll have a mix of freshwater and saltwater fish. To learn more, check out our fishing pages.
The basics include a rod, reel, line, hook, and bait or lure that are matched to the type of fish you’re after. Generally, spin-casting equipment is easier for beginners than baitcasting equipment. You’ll also want a tackle box with various hooks, baits, lures and other tackle.
The best way to learn is to just do it. You can also practice away from the water – in a large, open area, away from people or pets. Start by checking out the basics on our website.

Start with our reference pages of our website, which include interactive maps. Additionally, they list Stocked Trout Waters, Class A Wild Trout Streams, Special Regulation Areas, and much more.

We have a number of other pages that have interactive maps to locate topic-specific information, such as Local Lakes, Biologist Reports, and Fishing Hot Spots. We also list more Commission maps and guides and other Resources of Maps that are helpful in locating places to fish and boat.

The right line to use depends on what kind of fish you’re after and where you’re fishing. Fishing line is referred to by “pound test” – the strength of the line. A number of factors go into determining the right line and pound test to use.
A fishing rig is a way you tie together your bait or lure, hook and other tackle to your fishing line in order to attract fish. Rigs are used for specific types of fishing.
Coolers with ice for your food and drinks, all fishing gear, light snacks, and water.
Our common game fish include blue marlin, striped marlin, spearfish, bass, yellow-fin tuna or skipjack tuna.
Yes. We advertise, “Keep Your Catch” and we mean it. All boated fish will be cut up and bagged. On a private charter, you may have as much as you want. On a share charter, we insist the fish be shared with everyone onboard that wants to take some of the catch.

Some of your questions

What size of the boat do I need?

When choosing a boat, one of the most important things needed is enough shaded seating area for everyone. Though you probably plan on getting in on some sunshine, you'll want to be able to hide from it too. All our boats offer air conditioned cabins. While this can be very nice, shaded areas with open air ventilation are sufficient. Most boats also have a flying bridge (upper deck) where there's even more shaded seating. This is where most people like to spend the day because of the great view and the cool breeze. Some boats have seating for everyone on the bridge but other boats (like the popular 35' Waverider) have only two seats on the bridge and the captain takes up one of them.


Where can I go fishing?

Lakes, ponds, rivers, streams – they're all great places to find fish. Bays and estuaries contain a mixture of fresh water and salt water, so they'll have a mix of freshwater and saltwater fish. To learn more, check out our fishing pages.


What basic gear will I need?

The basics include a rod, reel, line, hook, and bait or lure that are matched to the type of fish you’re after. Generally, spin-casting equipment is easier for beginners than baitcasting equipment. You’ll also want a tackle box with various hooks, baits, lures and other tackle.


How can I learn to cast?

The best way to learn is to just do it. You can also practice away from the water – in a large, open area, away from people or pets. Start by checking out the basics on our website.


Where can I get a map of the area?

Start with our reference pages of our website, which include interactive maps. Additionally, they list Stocked Trout Waters, Class A Wild Trout Streams, Special Regulation Areas, and much more.

We have a number of other pages that have interactive maps to locate topic-specific information, such as Local Lakes, Biologist Reports, and Fishing Hot Spots. We also list more Commission maps and guides and other Resources of Maps that are helpful in locating places to fish and boat.


What kind of fishing line should I use?

The right line to use depends on what kind of fish you’re after and where you’re fishing. Fishing line is referred to by “pound test” – the strength of the line. A number of factors go into determining the right line and pound test to use.


What is a rig?

A fishing rig is a way you tie together your bait or lure, hook and other tackle to your fishing line in order to attract fish. Rigs are used for specific types of fishing.